Springtime Parasite Safety For Your Dog

outdoor dogs

Springtime Parasite Safety For Your Dog

 

It’s the time of year when your pet is going to start spending more time outdoors. You may not give much thought to who he shares that space with—but you should. From deer and coyotes to foxes, skunks, bats, and raccoons, wild animals can pose a serious threat as they carry a variety of diseases that can be transmitted to pets and people. Springtime parasite safety for your dog is definitely something you want to think about.

Rabies

  • Rabies is a disease caused by a virus that attacks the brain. It can affect any warm-blooded animal, including dogs, cats, and humans. It is almost always fatal.
  • All mammals can contract rabies, but some are more susceptible than others. Foxes, skunks, and raccoons are particularly prone to rabies and can be carriers. The disease is transmitted by the bite of a rabid animal to another mammal.
  • The best way to prevent rabies is to have your pet vaccinated. For more information visit pet vaccinations

 Leptospirosis

  • Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that affects livestock, wildlife, companion animals, and humans. Symptoms of the disease can vary, but common signs include fever, lethargy, and vomiting. The disease can be fatal if left untreated or even if treatment is delayed.
  • Leptospirosis is most commonly transmitted through standing water or soil contaminated with the urine of infected animals. Pets at particularly high risk include those who frequent dog parks, visit hiking trails or other nature areas that have an increase in wildlife traffic, or spend any time outdoors, even if only in the yard. Pets that are walked in common areas such as apartment complexes or busier neighborhoods are also at great risk.
  • A vaccine is available to protect your pet against leptospirosis infection. In addition, be sure not to let your pet drink from standing water and avoid any areas that may be contaminated.

Tapeworms

  • Tapeworms are long, flat worms that live in your pet’s intestines.
  • In order to become infected with tapeworms, your pet must ingest a flea that contains tapeworm eggs. This process begins when fleas are accidentally ingested upon licking or chewing the skin. The flea is digested within your pet’s intestine and the tapeworm hatches, anchoring itself to the intestinal lining. We are seeing an increased number of pets with fleas every year, even in the city.
  • Tapeworm infections are treated with a deworming medication that kills the worms within the intestines.
  • The most effective way to prevent infections in pets and humans is through aggressive and thorough flea control.

 Giardiaswimming dogs

  • Giardia is a parasite that lives in the intestines and is passed in the feces. In some humans and animals, it can cause diarrhea and cramping known as Giardiasis. Anything that comes in contact with feces from infected humans or animals can be contaminated with the Giardia parasite.
  • Wildlife including beavers, muskrats, deer, coyotes, and rodents are frequent carriers of Giardia. Pets may become infected after drinking from puddles or ponds or swallowing infected stool from other animals. Signs of Giardia infection include diarrhea, greasy stools, and dehydration.
  • Giardiasis can be treated with medication; however, this parasite can persist in the environment and lead to reinfection. Because of this, environmental disinfection is also critical.

Tick Transmitted Diseases

  • Ticks are blood-feeding external parasites that can attach to both animals and humans and spread transmit numerous bacterial diseases, including Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.
  • Ticks are unable to jump and instead find their hosts through a behavior called “questing.” Questing ticks perch on leaves or blades of grass with their front legs extended, waiting to climb onto a host that brushes past. They can easily grab a hold of your pet’s fur as he travels through particularly grassy, bushy, or wooded areas. The tick then burrows down through the hair where it attaches to the skin.
  • When it comes to preventing ticks and the diseases they spread, consistent parasite control is key. In addition, you should always examine your pet thoroughly after hikes or other outdoor activities. If you find a tick on your pet, it is important to remove it as soon as possible, if you are unsure or unable to remove it yourself please call your vet for assistance.
  • A Lyme disease vaccine may be also be recommended for pets who are highly exposed to ticks.

As always, do not hesitate to contact us with any questions. staff@gentletouchanimalhospital.com or 303.691.3720


Pet Cold Weather Tips

Pet Cold Weather

Pet Cold Weather Tips

 

Yes, our four-legged furry members do have a fur coat (most of them), but this is not always the only thing they need when the temperature dips. They can be hearty but there are potentially dangerous hazards every pet parent must be aware of. The following are some pet cold weather tips:

 

General Safety:

  • Make sure they are wearing a collar with clearly marked tags and that the microchip is in place and all information associated with it is current.
  • Double check that your fence is secure. You also want to make sure you have a strong gate latch, as these are the first to blow open in a gusty storm.
  • Be ready for anything, including power outages, blocked roads and closed stores/vet offices. Never let your supply of food and medications get lower than a weeks’ worth.
  • Pet proof your interior spaces. Watch for open flames, space heaters and other winter objects that can be a hazard.
  • Better yet, bring ‘em in. Cold weather can exacerbate medical conditions such as arthritis and asthma. Visit AVMA.org for more information.

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Walks:

  • Keep them on a leash at all times. Paws.org states that more pets are lost in the winter than any other time. They can lose scent trails and/or become disoriented in harsh weather.
  • Stay off any ice. Pets will fall through and you will go in after them. It is not safe for either of you.
  • Shorter haired pets need a coat. You might also consider one for your senior pet. They have a harder time regulating their temperature.
  • Protect their paws and rinse them as soon as you get home. Salt is toxic and they will lick it off of their paws. Make sure all snow that has accumulated between their pads is rinsed off with warm water.

 

Car Trips:

  • Cats are known to hide under cars during the cold months. Bang on your hood and look under your car before starting the engine.
  • Antifreeze is used in abundance this time of year and pets are attracted to its’ sweet taste. Even a tiny amount can be lethal to your furry family member. Wipe up any spills and keep containers stored where it is not accessible.
  • Just as in summer months, never leave a pet alone in the car. It just is not safe!

 

As in any medical emergency, make sure you call your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet is suffering from hypothermia or toxic poisonings. The signs to look for are:

  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of appetite
  • Extreme thirstsnowy catt
  • Dilated pupils
  • Weak pulse
  • Extreme shivering or slowed movement

This list is not all inclusive, so use your best judgement. As always, contact Gentle Touch Animal Hospital with any questions. staff@gentletouchanimalhospital.com or 303.691.3720. Visit gentletouchanimalhospital.com for more information on us.